Tired Much? Stop and Listen to Your Body

tried entrepreneur

Ever notice how we don’t see articles about entrepreneurs and professionals being tired?

Instead, we hear about the geniuses like Elon Musk who do two things at a time (like juggle a child on his knee while answering email), or existing on four or five hours sleep.

But fatigue? We just don’t talk about it. We’re all about psyching up, charging to full capacity, caffeine buzzed, and onward and upward. But here’s the thing: we all get tired. And yet somehow, rest or naps are translated to laziness. We’re presented with stories of leaders who we’re supposed to believe have super powers and never wear out.

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How to Win Your Weekends and Head into the Workweek with Peace and Clarity

“What are you doing this weekend?”

Don’t know yet?

If you’re like me, your answer runs the gamut of shouting, “Nothing! I need to chill!” to having a full-on list of everything that got neglected during your busy workweek.

Because let’s face it, you’re killing it during the workweek, boasting no shortage of lists, bullet journals, and meetings; check it off, and boom, boom, boom, you’re a master of productivity.

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The Future is Female, and I’m Here to Help Push That Reality

future is female

I’m a little pissed off.

But you see, I’m not an angry person – I’ve been called bitchy or bossy before (which I don’t mind), but not angry.

After raising my three girls in what I thought was a post-feminist era, having the good fortune to enter the tech field in the late nineties with a group of men and women who worked together without barriers, now – now in the 21st century, I’ve been awakened again to the ugly reality of sexism’s far reaching tentacles and finding out that we’re not where I thought we were.

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Reflecting on #TeamWeek

It’s a pretty usual Monday morning – waking up to the weekly routine (6am power walk followed by coffee and digging in to the week’s plan, emails, and daily focus time) – except it’s not. I’m wanting to hold onto last week a little longer and savor the yumminess.

bldg313Nope, wasn’t vacation. And though we did win a contract (always worth savoring) – it’s not that. Last week was my brainchild for holding the team together spread out by miles, trying to maintain the level of teamwork, collaboration and intentional strong culture we need to succeed and thrive – #TeamWeek.

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Women in leadership – diversity yields dividends

Guest post from Kim Villenueve in Women in Leadership Network. Originally posted on Vistage. 

The call for greater diversity at senior leadership levels is not new, although it has itself become more inclusive, extending beyond gender, race and ethnicity, to encompass age, education, socioeconomic background and sexual orientation, as well as experience, skills and talent.

It is also not news that diversifying leadership teams can pay financial dividends for corporations. As early as 2004, research by Catalyst, Inc. showed a significant positive correlation between financial performance and female representation at the executive level[i] with female Board representation having an even stronger effect.

Most recently, a new international study by McKinsey & Co.[ii] showed that companies with gender diverse leadership are 15% more likely to report financial returns above their national industry median, while those with ethnically diverse leadership were 35% more likely to have financial returns that outpace their industry.  Sadly, none of the 366 public companies surveyed stood out as leaders on both gender and ethnic diversity axis together.

In spite of the long-established case for balancing executive teams, the C-Suite has remained stubbornly homogeneous. Only 4.6% of chief executives of S&P 500 companies are women, and there are just six black CEOs of Fortune 500 companies currently.[iii] Progress has been made, but slowly and inconsistently. In their recent study mentioned above, for example, McKinsey & Co. notes that women now represent about 16% of executive teams in U.S. companies overall, calling that “measurable progress” but acknowledging that women remain underrepresented at senior levels globally.

Picking up the pace

Is this glacial pace of change in senior leadership team composition due to entrenched discrimination? Not necessarily, according to a diversity discussion panel at this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos.[iv] Their consensus is that a lack of diversity in executive teams is less about overt discrimination than it is about unconscious biases toward affinity: people tend to hire people like themselves. If an executive team has traditionally been composed of a particular demographic, shifting the team’s composition will require a conscious effort by all members to acknowledge and challenge assumptions about gender, race, nationality, background or age so as to embrace a different profile.

Successfully challenging unconscious biases may require the independent perspective of a third party, such as an executive coach, who can observe and call attention to them in a constructive manner, while supporting subsequent behavioral change.

As leadership teams become more diverse their networks will naturally expand, however access to broader networks in order to identify and recruit top caliber diverse candidates will be a challenge initially. Partnering with an executive search team that has a track record of success in securing high quality, diverse candidates can provide much-needed traction in this area, while collaborative leadership consulting can be an effective tool to help develop synergy and effectively integrate the new executive into the team.

Moving the needle: Strategies for success

Here are four steps to accelerate the diversification of your executive team:

  1. Intentionally diversify your team through succession planning and targeted search
  2. Address unconscious bias in the search and selection process through coaching and dialogue
  3. Look for a track record of building inclusive cultures when evaluating executives you’d like to attract to your organization
  4. Create synergy with incumbent team members prior to, and through, effective onboarding of new hires who represent different perspectives

McKinsey & Co. note that the positive financial impact of gender diversity for American businesses only kicks in after “women constitute at least 22% of a senior executive team.’’ It can be safely assumed, then, that there is also a critical mass for ethnic and other underrepresented populations with regard to financial impact. The companies who are first to achieve that critical mass may reap the rewards in the form of significantly accelerated competitive advantage. Diversity in the C-Suite is no longer a business requirement—it is an imperative.

This article was adapted for Vistage from Centerstone Executive Search. Dr. Kim Villeneuve is CEO of Centerstone Executive Search & Consulting, a nationally retained firm providing executive-level search and leadership consulting to the consumer sector. Kim is also a coach for elite executives, an adjunct professor at American University’s Kogod School of Business, and guest lecturer at The George Washington University, from which she holds a doctorate in Human and Organizational Learning. Contact Kim at kim@centerstonesearch.com or at 425-836-8445.

[i] “The Bottom Line: Connecting Corporate Performance and Gender Diversity” January 15, 2004 Catalyst, Inc.

[ii] Why Diversity Matters” By Vivian Hunt, Dennis Layton, and Sara Prince McKinsey, & Co. January 2015

[iii] “Is there a diversity dividend?” Linda Yueh, Chief Business Correspondent, BBC News January 25, 2015 http://www.bbc.com/news/business-30973184

[iv] World Economic Forum Annual Meeting, January 2015 http://www.weforum.org/events/world-economic-forum-annual-meeting-2015/sessions/diversity-dividend

Succeeding in a Boys Club

I’m fresh off one of the best hours or so I’ve spent in months. Maybe years. I want to believe I’m an advocate for women succeeding in their careers, business and life – but I don’t often get to see the energy of several hundred women in a room together expressing their successes, frustrations, hopes and dreams.

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Weighing in: My Ticketing Predictions for 2016

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I’m not sure that anyone could have accurately predicted all the action in ticketing in 2015. Just to jog your memory:

AXS buys Veritix. Shubert buys Choice. Ticketmaster buys FrontGate. Vendini buys CrowdTorch. Pandora buys Ticketfly. Etix founder returns to CEO position and Joe Kustelski is out. Brian Arnone is out at TicketFly and in at ShowClix. Fred Mangione is in at TopTix.

I’m pretty sure I missed some but even so – the theme seems to be shifting sands.

Meanwhile, what did we do as an industry to serve the fans and venues? What new technologies came to the market to really make things better?

Sigh. Nada. Nix. So we go marching on to 2016, where this is what I think will happen – or in some cases, wish. Continue reading

Are Pandora and Ticketfly Really Changing Ticketing Forever?

Yesterday, everyone in the ticketing world gasped a little – though not from surprise – that the venture-grabbing little brother to Ticketmaster, Ticketfly, was snatched up in a staggering $450 million acquisition by music streaming giant, Pandora.

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It was no surprise that Ticketfly was priming to flip from the start; in fact, the run of endless capital seemed to go on for so long, some scratched our heads, wondering “When? And who?” Continue reading

5 Steps to a More Balanced, Highly Productive Morning

One of my morning reads recently was a blog post from Dale Partridge about his 5 Steps To An INSANELY Productive Morning.

Dale, I love your book (People Over Profit) and your blog (thedailypositive.com). Your angle on life and business is right on. But while your post had some good ideas, I frankly wanted to crawl back into bed in the fetal position just thinking about implementing your regimented steps!

I began crafting this post for those of us who aren’t cut from the same cloth as you. We, too, desire to wake up and face the day with a plan that will start and end with productivity — and yet not lose track of that balance we work so hard to keep. Continue reading

Millennials on the Rise: How this new era of historic theatre managers is changing the game

Last week, I attended the League of Historic American Theatres (LHAT) annual conference in Nashville. Several hundred of us meet annually with an aggressive agenda: tour historic theatres in the cities we meet in; connect with other people who, like us, love the often crumbling theatres we work in; equip ourselves with new ideas and knowledge; and connect with industry providers who offer Continue reading