Just Imagine (My response to the Hillary Conundrum)

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As a female business leader and entrepreneur, intimately interested in furthering opportunities for women to succeed and be paid equally with our male counterparts, it’s a no-brainer that I will comment and weigh in on Hillary’s presidential campaign.

First, in full disclosure, I’m a registered Democrat. So of course I’m happy to have my own party putting what will (likely) be the first woman at the head of the presidential ticket. Continue reading

Fighting to Play

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Most people that know me know that I’m the proud mother of three beautiful, bright young women.

When my girls were younger, I encouraged them to follow their dreams and build the future that they wanted. As a working mom, I could only hope that I led by example—that they would see they could enter the workforce as a woman and not come up against discrimination.

If only that were true.  Continue reading

Staying Angry: 3 Things to do to Give Women Opportunity

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I grew up in the 70’s—a time I think was a pretty fantastic to be a kid. My generation didn’t go off to war, survived inflation but not a depression, had a strong and normal middle class, and feared nothing at school except a bad grade.

However, I never realized—until I was about twelve and in sixth grade —that women and girls didn’t have the same opportunities as men and boys. I dreamed of being a doctor, a lawyer, or a TV news reporter, without knowledge or thought of the glass ceiling.

But then Little League happened. While I didn’t play baseball (basketball and track, yes), I had a good friend who did. Penny wanted to play baseball, and since there were no girls teams to play on at the time, she wanted to join the boys team.

Penny’s quest to play Little League with the boys became a big story in my small world. She was fiery, insistent and knew she could outplay many of the boys on the team. But when she showed up to join, she was turned away. For lack of . . . Continue reading